How To Approach Any Training Move/Strength Feat

Hey peeps, I am making this article to answer one of the most frequently asked questions that I receive – “I am stuck with the One Arm Chin/Pull Ups/Planche/Front Lever/Back Lever/Weighted Dips/Pull-Ups/Chin-Ups….WHAT DO I DO NOW!?” Sit tight and follow my lead. :) The most common mistake amongst most athletes is that they rush things […]


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Hey peeps, I am making this article to answer one of the most frequently asked questions that I receive – “I am stuck with the One Arm Chin/Pull Ups/Planche/Front Lever/Back Lever/Weighted Dips/Pull-Ups/Chin-Ups….WHAT DO I DO NOW!?” Sit tight and follow my lead. :)


The most common mistake amongst most athletes is that they rush things up! The desire to try and obtain a new move is so big that it usually leads to over-training, slower progress and oftenly unwanted injuries. To avoid these and fasten your progress you should understand the key points to learning a new strength feat.

1. Examine and study the move

You know how I always say that the moves you see in my videos are strength based with no to very little technique. Well that is completely true BUT you still need to find the answers of several important questions. For example Which muscle groups are the ones that are involved in the move? How are they being involved in the move? Which of them are taking most of the load in the move?

Every strength move is based on certain muscle groups. The stronger the muscle groups the higher the chance of holding or performing the move. Which is precisely your goal. Once you understand which muscle groups are involved in the exercise you’ll be able to train them additionally and gain strength there!

Aside of that it is also important to realise the way they are being engaged in the movement. For example let’s compare the back muscle groups in the front and back levers. In the front lever your back is pushing your body upwards and in the back lever it is pulling it upwards. These are two very distinguishable types of strength which you should develop separately and in a different manner. Always trying to simulate the motion of the actual, of the original move.

Also knowing which muscle groups are the most heavily engaged in the certain exercise will give you a proper idea of how to arrange your workout sessions. Needless to say you’ll have to pay more attention to the leading muscle groups. Ex.: With the Muscle-Up – that would be your shoulders, chest, triceps.

2. Plan well your workouts

Now that you can answer the above questions you are ready to construct your own workout regimen.

Your workout towards that specific move(s) should take no longer than ~40-60mins. That’s it! You are training strength here, not technique. That’s exactly how much time your body will need in order to receive enough stimulation for strength and muscle size gains.

Plan the workout starting with direct variations of the exercise(tucked/one leg extended/assisted/etc.). Then follow that up with assisting exercises. You should proceed basing the workout on that knowledge from step 1. The muscle groups which do most of the work in the specific hold/feat should be given special care, should be trained more actively. Try simulating the original feeling and motion which you experienced during the direct exercising part of the workout, now using lastics or weights. Basically you want to use direct exercising for when you feel fresh and then switch to assisting immediately after you start sensing fatigue. Good ex.: 1-2 direct exercises of 6-3 sets, 1-3 reps. Then following that with 2-3 assisting exercises with 3 sets of 8-12 reps.

Next you need to continue thinking of different variations to add up to your workout plan. The more that you can come up with, the better. It is always a good idea to broaden your horizon, stressing the muscles again and again. Muscles should never get used to your workout. With the exercises that you see me perform it should not be a problem since they are based on so many muscle groups. Rotate the direct exercises that you begin your workouts with and also switch the muscle groups involved on the assisting exercises.

3. Stay consistent

Having settled step1 & step2 you are more than halfway done with the new feat. These are the most important parts of learning it, the foundations of the training process. From then on it’s all about consistent training and lifestyle regimen.

Nonetheless this appears to be a serious problem for many people. It is either school, work, family, friends, gf or all of these all together. Life’s busy nowadays that is true. That is why you should plan ahead. Usually I try and observe how things are coming along – dates, meetings, so I can plan my workouts for the whole week.

I never miss a workout, no matter how busy I am I can always find 30 minutes EACH day for working out. You can too! And I am not talking about 30 minutes straight, you can divide them into portions. A minute now, a minute later, mark your move 20 times throughout the day and it is more than enough to maintain your form if not even add up to it. It is my own technique that allows me to remain on top of my game even though my lifestyle got so busy in the last half an year.

Hope this helps you, please post all your question and guide me helping you!

-Arthlete