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Choosing A Good Dipping Belt, Chin-Up/Pull-Up Belt

Fans do often direct one particular question at me when it comes to weighted pull-ups – what belt am I using for my weighted dips, weighted chin-ups and weighted pull-ups? A lot of people are being misled thinking the only way to go with weighted pull-ups is by spending a fortune over an expensive leather […]


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Fans do often direct one particular question at me when it comes to weighted pull-ups – what belt am I using for my weighted dips, weighted chin-ups and weighted pull-ups? A lot of people are being misled thinking the only way to go with weighted pull-ups is by spending a fortune over an expensive leather belt that was “specifically” designed for weighted dips. As somebody who owns one of the expensive chin-up belts on the market I will shed some light on how much it was worth its money.

 

1. What is a good belt for weighted dips or weighted chin-ups/pull-ups?

Choosing A Good Dipping Belt, Chin Up/Pull Up Belt

Well any belt from a well known brand can be a good belt. However if you are on a tight budget and are looking for more flexibility in your training, then I recommend you looking outside of the box. The one expensive belt that I bought was by Schiek but I only used it several times. Mainly when recording the pull-up bar video just because it looks better on camera. On all other occasions I would stick to a much more simplified solution to weighted pull-ups using an ordinary karate/sambo belt. I got the idea from a friend of mine. He told me that in the Sambo school, which his father runs, all athletes would chin-up attaching weights using their sambo belts. So I gave it a try as well.

 

2. Why did I go for a Sambo/Karate belt over a leather belt?

Choosing A Good Dipping Belt, Chin Up/Pull Up Belt

The main 3 points would be these:

  • It costs less than $5. In comparison the commercial dipping belts start from $55.
  • It’s incredibly light and compact to carry around. The commercial dipping belts are very big, take a lot of space in your bag and weigh a lot more!
  • The chances of it falling off your waist are zero. Sometimes I find it very hard to keep the commercial dipping belts for weighted pull-ups on my waist. 

Practically any sambo/karate/martial arts’ belt would do just as good as a 10 times more expensive leather belt. Martial arts’ belts are much smaller, lighter, so compact that you can always bring them along with you when you are travelling to the gym or even outside of the city. Only downside to them is that once you surpass 150lbs. the straps of the belt start hurting the waist. If you put something soft in between your waist and the belt though you can easily get around this problem.

Choosing A Good Dipping Belt, Chin Up/Pull Up Belt

Before I finish this article I will give you one additional example. After I got my Schiek belt I only did one training session and one of the rivets completely fell off. What happened is that on my last pull-up I let go of the pull-up bar and the motion from the movement broke the belt. What’s amusing is that I would usually let go like that off the pull-up bar after my last weighted pull-up and it have never damaged the Sambo/Karate belt. So after my first training I had to repair the Schiek belt which costed me more money and time. On the other training sessions with it I had to be gentle so it would not break again. Fancy belt but definitely not the most durable one.

For more information on the belts in the article(and video) please visit the links below:

-Schiek – Price: $50
-Karate Belt – Price: $4

There’s a video in addition to this article which you can see below:

Sincerely,
-Arthlete